How to Start the Granny Rectangle in Two Ways

A Photo Tutorial

Granny crochet projects are so versatile and can definitely challenge your creative imagination. The Daisy Granny Squares are so much fun to make and I am still coming up with projects where I can use up all the squares that I made. I will post new projects on this blog as they happen.

Meanwhile, I wanted to share with you how you can start your own granny rectangles. These are perfect for blankets since you can totally customize the lengths of your sides.

I have come across two ways on how you can start crocheting a granny rectangle. The difference lies on the spine style or the foundation of your rectangle. Here are swatches for both spine styles. Both ways are on the tutorial photos and patterns below.

  • (Left photo): Spine #1 – The spine has three clusters consisted of three double crochet.
  • (Right photo):  Spine #2 – The spine has top and bottom double crochet clusters as well as on each side.  

The photos above show swatches if you are changing the colors after every row. For these examples, I used the same yarn that we are using in our tutorial below in a different color way, which was Tranquil.

For this tutorial, I used Lion Brand Yarn’s Mandala Ombre in Harmony and a US H8 (5.00mm) crochet hook. This project is going to be an afghan/throw and I am intending to use one color for the entire project.

SPINE #1

[1] To start your foundation ch, make a slip knot, ch 12.

[1] To start your foundation ch, make a slip knot, ch 12.


[2] Dc into the 6th ch from the hook. Dc 2 into the same ch to create a 3-dc cluster.

[2] Dc into the 6th ch from the hook. Dc 2 into the same ch to create a 3-dc cluster.


[3] Skip the next 2 ch, dc 3 into the next ch to create the 2nd cluster.

[3] Skip the next two ch, dc 3 into the next ch to create the 2nd cluster.


[4] Repeat [3] for the third cluster. At this point, you will have the slip knot left on your foundation ch. Dc 1 into that slip knot.

[4] Repeat [3] for the third cluster. At this point, you will have the slip knot left on your foundation ch. Dc 1 into that slip knot.


You should have something that looks like this: two posts on both sides and three clusters in between the posts. If you wish to add more clusters to make the long sides of your rectangle longer, add a multiple of three chains for each cluster in your foundation ch and repeat [3].

You should have something that looks like this: two posts on both sides and three clusters in between the posts. If you wish to add more clusters to make the long sides of your rectangle longer, add a multiple of three chains for each cluster in your foundation ch and repeat [3].


Wrong side

Reverse your work. You will notice that the wrong side is bumpier than the right side. Turn your work after every round.


Round 2: Now working on the wrong side, ch 3 (this counts as your 1st dc). Into the same space, dc 2 to create your 1st cluster. Dc 3 into the next cluster space until you reach the end of the row. You should have four clusters at this point.

Round 2: Now working on the wrong side, ch 3 (this counts as your 1st dc). Into the same space, dc 2 to create your 1st cluster. Dc 3 into the next cluster space until you reach the end of the row. You should have four clusters at this point.


You are now forming your corners, so ch 2, dc 3 into the same ch space (dc post), ch 2 for another corner, dc 3 into the same ch space (dc post).

You are now forming your corners, so ch 2, dc 3 into the same ch space (dc post), ch 2 for another corner, dc 3 into the same ch space (dc post). At this point, your project should look like this.


Complete the bottom row by making three clusters in each dc space. These spaces are easier to find since you are now just following the clusters from the top row. After this, you are approaching the corners on the other side. Ch 2, dc 3 into the same ch space (dc post), ch 2 for the last corner, slip stitch into the 1st dc of the round. Turn your work to start on round three.


For round three and the remaining rounds, the pattern is the same. A cluster of 3-dc will be on each dc space except the corners where you add two chains between the clusters. I added a couple more rounds to where we left off.

After a couple more rows, you should have something like this.

The photo above shows the encircled corners. This is the pattern for every corner: 3-dc cluster, ch 2, 3-dc cluster

Do 3-dc clusters in each cluster space like shown with the arrows.

SPINE #2

To start your foundation ch, make a slip knot, ch 12. Add ch 3 (counts as 1 dc).


Dc into the 4th ch from the hook. Dc 1 into the same ch to create a 3-dc cluster. This cluster will be the side of your rectangle.


You are now forming your first corner. Ch 2, dc 3 into the same ch. This cluster will be part of a long side.


Skip the next two ch, dc 3 into the next ch to create another cluster. Repeat three more times. At this point, your project should look like the above photo.


You are now on your 2nd corner. Ch 2, dc 3 into the same ch. This cluster will be the other side of your rectangle. Ch2 for the 3rd corner and dc 3 into the same ch to start your bottom row clusters.

You are now on your 2nd corner. Ch 2, dc 3 into the same ch. This cluster will be the other side of your rectangle. Ch 2 for the 3rd corner and dc 3 into the same ch to start your bottom row clusters.


For the rest of the bottom clusters, follow the placement of the top clusters and make your 3-dc clusters in the same chains until you reach the end of the bottom row.
  • Left photo: For the rest of the bottom clusters, follow the placement of the top clusters and make your 3-dc clusters in the same chains until you reach the end of the bottom row.
  • Right photo: Make a cluster into the last space where your 1st corner is. Ch 2 to create the 4th and last corner. Join with a slip stitch with the side cluster.

Reverse your work. You will notice that the wrong side is bumpier than the right side. Turn your work after every round.


Ch 3 and turn your work 90 degrees clockwise to start working on the top clusters of round 2.


The photo above shows where the corners should be. The ch 3 you just worked on counts as the 1st dc of the 1st 3-dc cluster.


Make a ch 2 after the cluster for the top right corner and make another 3-dc cluster as part of the corner pattern. Make four clusters for the top of the round until reaching the next corner where you are proceeding with the corner pattern.


Repeat this process until the end of the round. Join with a slip stitch.


Your project should look something like this. Continue building on, following the corner pattern and working 3-dc clusters along the sides.


After a couple more rows, you should have something like this.


The photo above shows the encircled corners. This is the pattern for every corner: 3-dc cluster, ch 2, 3-dc cluster. Do 3-dc clusters in each cluster space like shown with the arrows. To continue, you just need to keep building it to make it your desired length and width.

Whew! Just a little trivia: Did you know that I just used 50+ photos for this particular tutorial? That is definitely a lot of pictures to edit. It is all worth it though. I love sharing my love of crochet and knitting with all of you.

I hope that you enjoy this tutorial. Please feel free to reach out to me is something is unclear or if you need some help deciphering it. Share and inspire.

Happy crocheting and blessings to you all!

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