Trinity Stitch

  • This page contains affiliate links. It means I may get a small commission on qualifies purchases if you click on a link that is no extra cost to you. This helps me create and provide quality content to my readers. Visit my Privacy Policy page for more information.

Yarn used: Lion Brand Yarn Kitchen Cotton in Kiwi (discontinued) | Needles: US 8 (5.0mm) Takumi Knitting Needles by Clover USA

This stitch creates a really nice texture. Even the back looks clean and looks like its own design.

Pattern:

Source: The Complete Photo Guide to Knitting 2nd Edition

by Margaret Hubert | Published by @QuartoCreates

Skill Level: Easy

  • Cast on a multiple of 4 plus 2.
  • Row 1 (RS): K1, purl to last st, k1.
  • Row 2: K1, *(k1, p1, k1) all in next st,p3tog, rep from * across row to last st, end k1.
  • Row 3 (RS): K1, purl to last st, k1.
  • Row 4: K1, *p3tog, (k1, p1, k1) all in next st, rep from * across row to last st, end k1.
  • Repeat Rows 1-4 for pattern.

What do you think of this pattern? I would love to see what you make of it!

Happy knitting!

ALL PATTERN CREDITS GO TO THE NAMED AUTHOR AND PUBLISHER. THIS POST WAS SHARED WITH WRITTEN PERMISSION FROM AUTHORIZED OWNER(S).

Clean Stripes Rib Stitch

The rib stitch is a versatile stitch that creates a nice stretch to your handmade garments. It is often used in hat brims (sometimes the whole hat), cuffs, waistbands and other specialized uses. To create the rib stitch, we alternate knit and purl stitches in the working row or round and follow the same stitch on the next row(s) or round(s) until we achieve the desired height of the rib stitch.

How to achieve clean stripes when using two or more colors

As much as I love using neutral colors in my knitting, I love using colorful yarns. I am always excited to combine colors in my work. Stripes are one of my favorites. Doing stripes with the rib stitch, however, gets a little more interesting.  Let us take a closer look.

Here is a swatch sample of a 2×2-rib stitch, which means the pattern uses knit two purl two or K2, p2. It looks like this when not stretched.

In the photos below, the middle line shows how I knitted the top and bottom parts in two different ways. On the top half, when switching colors, I knit the first row instead of following the rib stitches (knit if it is a knit stitch or purl if it is a purl stitch on the bottom row). However, on the bottom half of the photos, I followed the stitch below. Let us stretch this swatch and look closely.

Figure A – Front of the swatch:

The upper half of the photo shows clean stripes while on the bottom half, notice that the two colors clash a little along the lines.

Figure B – Back of the swatch:

Since I knitted the first row of the color switches, the back shows the purl stitches created which are the visible lines on the upper half of the photo. The bottom half also shows how the two colors clash a little along the lines.

As a conclusion, if both sides of the piece will show (a perfect example would be a scarf), my personal choice would be to follow the rib stitch pattern shown on the bottom half of the photos. It will not have clean stripes but since the elasticity of the ribbing stitch allows to hide the clashing lines, I would prefer that rather than the visible lines on the back (as shown on the top of Figure B).

For something such as a hat, I think the better choice would be the cleaner stripes. Hats when worn will be stretched so the clear lines would look nicer. The wrong side of the work will show the visible lines from the knit row but it would not matter because it will not be seen.

I hope you find this tip useful. Happy knitting!

© 2021 Shelah Knits, LLC

Simple Rib Knit Beanie

Handmade hats or beanies are simple are practical to give. They are personal and unique gifts. I think the most challenging part is actually making one that your recipient will like and actually use. People wear hats for many reasons. Up here in Alaska, it is mostly for staying warm and protection from the outdoor elements when the temperatures plummet.

  • This page may contain affiliate links. It means I may get a small commission if you click on a link that is no extra cost to you. This helps me create and provide quality content to my readers. Visit my Privacy Policy page for more information.

This pattern was inspired by a pattern online using the same 1 x 1 rib stitch, but I had to change the numbers (stitches and rows) to customize the size. DS likes his beanies with enough brim room to be folded and he wears it both ways. The decrease used was purl 3 stitches together (p3tog) to preserve the 1 x 1 rib stitch design. It is custom friendly in many ways.

  • Increasing or decreasing the number of rows to make it longer or shorter in height.
  • Increasing or decreasing the number of stitches by four for a smaller or larger hat width.

This particular pattern is a Regular Adult Size.

Materials:

  • Yarn used is Berroco Vintage in two yarn weights: Worsted and DK. Yarn composition is 52% acrylic, 40% wool and 8% nylon.
    • Worsted, 3.5 oz (100 g) / 218 yds (200 m), Color 5145 (Black)
    • DK, 3.5 oz (100 g) / 290 yds (26 m), Color 2134 (Red)
      • Yardage used:
        • Worsted – approximately 130 g / 284 yds
        • DK – 26 g / 76 yds
  • US 8 (5.0 mm) circular knitting needles, 16″
  • US 8 (5.0 mm) Double Pointed Needles (DPNs) for shaping the crown
  • Stitch marker
  • Tapestry needle for weaving the ends
  • Scissors
  • Tape measure or ruler

Gauge: 24 sts x 22 rows in 4″ square swatch using K1, p1 rib stitch, 2 strands (1 of each yarn weight)

Finished size: Width – 9″ Height – 11 1/2″

Abbreviations:

  • BOR – beginning of round
  • CO – cast on
  • k – knit
  • p – purl
  • sts – stitches
  • p3tog – purl 3 sts together

Pattern:

Note: Repeat sts inside the parentheses as indicated.

  • Using US 8 (5.0 mm), CO 108 sts using 2 strands of yarn held together (1 strand of each yarn weight). Palce BOR stitch marker. Join in the round, being careful not to twist sts.
  • Rounds 1-24: (K1, p1) until end of round.
  • Rounds 25- 48: Drop the DK strand (red) and replace it with another worsted weight strand (black) and continue in 1 x 1 rib stitch pattern until hat measures about 9 1/2″ from brim (about 24 rows).
  • Start decrease:
  • Round 49: (K1, p1) 11x, k1, p3tog, (k1, p1) 12x, k1, p3tog. Repeat. – (Total: 100 sts)
  • Round 50: (K1, p1) until end of round.
  • Round 51: (K1, p1) 10x, k1, p3tog, (k1, p1) 11x, k1, p3tog. Repeat. – (Total: 92 sts)
  • Round 52: (K1, p1) until end of round.
  • Round 53: (K1, p1)9x, k1, p3tog, (k1, p1) 10x, k1, p3tog. Repeat. – (Total: 84 sts)
  • Round 54: (K1, p1) 8x, k1, p3tog, (k1, p1) 9x, k1, p3tog. Repeat. – (Total: 76 sts)
  • Round 55: (K1, p1) 7x, k1, p3tog, (k1, p1) 8x, k1, p3tog. Repeat. – (Total: 68 sts)
  • Round 56: (K1, p1) 6x, k1, p3tog, (k1, p1) 7x, k1, p3tog. Repeat. – (Total: 60 sts)
  • Round 57: (K1, p1) 5x, k1, p3tog, (k1, p1) 6x, k1, p3tog. Repeat. – (Total: 52 sts)
  • Round 58: (K1, p1) 4x, k1, p3tog, (k1, p1) 5x, k1, p3tog. Repeat. – (Total: 44 sts)
  • Round 59: (K1, p1) 3x, k1, p3tog, (k1, p1) 4x, k1, p3tog. Repeat. – (Total: 36 sts)
  • Round 60: (K1, p1) 2x, k1, p3tog, (k1, p1) 3x, k1, p3tog. Repeat. – (Total: 28 sts)
  • Round 61: K1, p1, k1, p3tog, (k1, p1) 2x, k1, p3tog. Repeat. – (Total: 20 sts)
Free Shipping for orders over $30

Cut yarn, leaving about an 8-10 inch tail. Slip the remaining 20 sts off the knitting needle onto the tapestry needle and pull to close. Weave in all ends.

I hope you enjoy this pattern. Feel free to send me a message if you have any questions. I would also love to see your finished project(s).

Happy knitting!

© 2021 Shelah Knits, LLC

Seed Stitch II

This photo shows 2 samples of the Seed Stitch II using different yarn weights and knitting needle sizes.
  • This page contains affiliate links. It means I may get a small commission on qualified purchases if you click on a link that is no extra cost to you. This helps me create and provide quality content to my readers. Visit my Privacy Policy page for more information.

This knitting stitch creates a very lovely texture. It is also versatile and can bring you different looks just by switching your yarn and needles. This stitch is definitely recommended for novice knitters because it just uses the basic knit and purl stitches but with a little bit of creativity can bring you elegant looking pieces or accents in your handmade.

Pattern:

Source: The Complete Photo Guide to Knitting 2nd Edition

By Margaret Hubert | Published by @QuartoCreates

Skill Level: Easy

  • Cast on an odd number of stitches.
  • Row 1: K1, *p1, k1, rep from * across row.
  • Row 2: P1, *k1, p1, rep from * across row.
  • Row 3: P1, *k1, p1, rep from * across row.
  • Row 4: K1, *p1, k1, rep from * across row.
  • Repeat Rows 1-4 for pattern.

What do you think of this pattern? Using a super bulky yarn with this stitch will make a nice scarf or throw, and it knits up pretty fast because of the chunky yarn. I would love to see what you make of it!

ALL PATTERN CREDITS GO TO THE NAMED AUTHOR AND PUBLISHER. THIS POST WAS SHARED WITH WRITTEN PERMISSION FROM AUTHORIZED OWNER(S).

Chevron Stitch Pattern

  • This page contains affiliate links. It means I may get a small commission on qualifies purchases if you click on a link that is no extra cost to you. This helps me create and provide quality content to my readers. Visit my Privacy Policy page for more information.
Yarn used: Red Heart Soft Wine | Needles: US 7 (4.5mm) Takumi Knitting Needles by Clover USA

Source: The Complete Photo Guide to Knitting 2nd Edition

by Margaret Hubert | Published by @QuartoCreates

Skill Level: Intermediate

  • Cast on a multiple of 18 plus 1.
  • Rows 1 and 3: P1, *(k2, p2) twice, k1, (p2, k2) twice, p1, rep from * across row.
  • Rows 2 and 4: K1, *(p2, k2) twice, p1, (k2, p2) twice, k1, rep from * across row.
  • Rows 5 and 7: P1, *p1, k2, p2, k2, p3, (k2, p2), twice, rep from * across row.
  • Rows 6 and 8: K1, *k1, p2, k2, p2, k3, (P2, k2) twice, rep from * across row.
  • Rows 9 and 11: Same as Rows 2 and 4.
  • Rows 10 and 12: Same as Rows 1 and 3.
  • Rows: 13 and 15: Same as Rows 6 and 8.
  • Rows 14 and 16: Same as Rows 5 and 7.
  • Repeat Rows 1-16 for pattern.

What do you think of this pattern? It will be good for textured scarves and blankets. I would love to see what you make of it!

Happy knitting!

ALL PATTERN CREDITS GO TO THE NAMED AUTHOR AND PUBLISHER. THIS POST WAS SHARED WITH WRITTEN PERMISSION FROM AUTHORIZED OWNER(S).

Basic Two Needle Mittens

After Christmas, I was craving to do a different project than what I had been doing for the past few months. Lucky enough, I found an old pattern from Patons for Mittens and Gloves. I forgot that I had that pattern and I remember, I only did a pair of fingerless gloves out of it years ago. As you know I can not show the pattern here for copyright reasons but I will share with you some pointers that I have learned in making these lovely mittens.

Materials:

  • Pattern: Patons Next Steps Seven Mittens and Gloves 2014
  • Yarn: Lion Brand Wool-Ease | Medium Worsted Weight in Rose Heather
  • Knitting Needles: Takumi Clover US 6, 4.0mm DPNs (double pointed needles)
  • Stitch markers (optional)
  • Stitch counter (optional)

This pattern was worked flat starting from the ribbing to the fingers. The pattern originally calls for 2 sizes of knitting needles. US 5, 3.75mm was supposed to be used for this ribbing. Since I did not have them, I just used US 6, 4.0mm for the whole project which turned out alright as well.

As you can see from the photo above, it was a few rows of ribbing for the cuffs. After the ribbing and a few rows of stockinette stitch (knit on the right side, purl on the wrong side), the thumb gusset starts. It is simply increasing for the thumb placement.

Actually, I miscalculated the rows for the thumb. The first photo below shows that. I initially knitted too many rows and it ended up an inch long for my thumb. So I had to frog a few rows and shorten the thumb. The second photo shows the final thumb length and the third shows my right hand on top of it. It is actually a good idea to fit it as you go so you can be as accurate as possible with regards to the fit.

A couple of my favorite details about this project are the beautiful increases and decreases. I just love how seamless they are. On the first photo, it shows the beginning of the thumb gusset. It was a 1-stitch increase and then an increase of 2 stitches on the following rows. The second photo shows the decrease on the top part of the mittens, shaping the fingers. The right side decrease used ssk (slip, slip, knit) which decreases 1 stitch and the left side decreases used k2tog (knit 2 together) which also decreases 1 stitch.

The thumb gusset leaves a small hole but since there is a cast on part on this area, I used the extra yarn to just fill the hole by tightening a few stitches. In my experience, this is pretty common with knitting mittens and gloves.

The pattern was pretty much straightforward. Be prepared for some seam sewing. This pattern is actually in the Ravelry database but upon searching, it is unfortunately out of print. However, you can view this project on my Ravelry page.

What projects are you planning this year? I must admit, my projects helped me tremendously by keeping busy and staying challenged. I am so sorry that this pattern is no longer available. But I think it just inspired me to write a pattern for some mittens or gloves. I promise you, once that is finished, I will share it with all of you.

Happy new year and happy making!

Handmade Baby Hats and Plaid Pumpkins

Can you believe October is almost over? Even with this pandemic and our usual everyday challenges, life goes on. I am just hoping that everybody is doing well and staying safe during these crazy times.

Staying busy and occupied helps a lot to distract us from today’s limitations. For me, knitting saves me from going insane of boredom. Since winter is here, at least here in Alaska, I created my Christmas handmade line for hats and knitted goods. These are all listed at my ETSY shop. Most of these are kids sizes from newborn to toddler sizes. Feel free to message me if you have any custom size that is not on the listings. Get a head start with your holiday shopping for your loved ones, these are all unique handmade gifts.

Happy making!

Alaska Wildflowers Collection

Alaska has wonderful summers. It is in fact a much awaited time of the year where the outdoors become Alaskans’ playground. People go out to hike, camp, fish and just enjoy nature.

This summer, I am introducing my Alaska Wildflowers Collection. It is a tribute to Alaska’s gorgeous wildflowers: fireweed, lupine, forget-me-not and daisy. The Fireweed Chunky Hats actually came out last fall, receiving a really good response from our community.

Here are a few details regarding the stitches that I have used for each wildflower.

FIREWEED

The Fireweed Chunky Hats are simply crafted to highlight this gorgeous wildflower. The pink flowers are created using french knots and the leaves were stitched using long stitches.

LUPINE

The Lupine Chunky Hats use a variety of purple shade yarns to create a gradient effect. This gorgeous wildflower is stitched using french knots and lazy daisy stitches for the leaves.

FORGET ME NOT

The Forget Me Not Chunky Hats are stitched with the lovely bullion knot as the center and long stitches for the petals.

DAISIES

The Daisies Chunky Hats feature the lovely and friendly Shasta Daisies. The flowers petals are stitched using long stitches with the center stitch in french knots.

These hats are now available on Shelah Knits Etsy Shop. It would be a unique gift for your lady friends. Visit my shop or drop me a message.

Enjoy your summer!

Santa Claus House in North Pole, Alaska

HNPnook2It was such a delight visiting North Pole, Alaska for our first family road trip for the year!  My sister and brother-in-law came up here from Australia and we were so blessed to have had this amazing experience right in the middle of winter… at -40 degrees F!

Of course being in North Pole, we visited the world famous Santa Claus House – where festive creations and beautiful ideas were endless!  As a striving small business owner, I was so inspired to hone my craft and to come up with new ideas.

We stayed at The Hotel North Pole and was impressed by the Alaskan rustic Christmas ambience.  There was this little nook that I found that was perfect for knitting!  It made the Cable Headband I was working on even more special with the North Pole charm.

The cold?  Insane.  I know for a lot of people who live in cold weather places, this might not be a big deal.  For us who live in Anchorage though, this was a bit extreme.  Our vehicle did not have an engine block heater to keep the vehicle warm and so we had to get a magnetic block heater so the vehicle would not freeze for the night.  Yup, it was that cold.

No complaining here though.  Alaska is beautiful and whether it be winter, summer, spring or fall, no photo can capture and justify its beauty.

County Fair 2019

Wow! After months of market preparation, the County Fair that I was participating in finally wrapped this year. Dozens of vendors with their crafts, trade and expertise, our ever-loving community that never ceases to support our local dreamers, and of course, the dedication and commitment of the organizers all helped make this event a successful one for the books.

skfull

My handmade shop Shelah Knits featured trendy and fun hats, headbands and scarves.  Check out some of my photos from the fair.

I had some knitted pumpkins, my Fireweed cozies, fun kids’ hats, and trendy headbands and fingerless gloves.

Some of these items will be on my Etsy Shop so stop by and check them out!

Thank you to all who came out and dropped by. We hope to see you next year!

Knitted Pumpkins

It is only a week and a half to go before the market day I am going to be in and there are lots to do!

This week, I have been enjoying working on some knitted pumpkins.  The pattern is from FitFoodArtShop and I love it because it uses up some of my stash yarn.

The possibilities are just endless! You can combine any colors you want or any color stash you have for that matter.

See you next time and happy knitting!

Market Prep 2019

It’s been a week since fall started but here in Alaska, it seems like we are closely approaching the end of it. Check out the mountains around us and they are all screaming winter! That brings me to point out another exciting thing…. hat season!

sept2019-2

Knitting wise, I am having a blast.  I am currently doing a market prep for the end of October.  So for you makers out there, you know what this means.  I have been knitting away hats in different sizes for months now, and I am loving it.

stack2

New discovery: Lion Brand Yarn’s Wool Ease Thick and Quick has released newer colors.  I am not entirely sure when these colors came out.  However, among what I have used so far, these are my favorites: Coney Island which has gorgeous shades of fall colors and Astropolis which has pinks and purples.  These color ways definitely made my all-time fave list like the Hudson Bay.  Look how those colors play out!

How about you? Do you have a market or bazaar you are prepping for? Share with us what you’re working on.

Happy knitting!